Jack the Ripper – The Case Reopened BBC1

Programme Name: Jack the Ripper: The Case Reopened - TX: 04/04/2019 - Episode: n/a (No. n/a) - Picture Shows: with Anatomage table. Professor David Wilson, Emilia Fox - (C) BBC - Photographer: Hugh Campbell
Professor David Wilson and Emilia Fox (C) BBC

When I was on the last day of filming for BBC4’s Dark Son back in August, the film’s presenter and top criminologist David Wilson was chatting about the Jack the Ripper documentary he had just made with Emilia Fox.

He was talking about how the programme shed new light on the case. Let’s face it, the Ripper industry of books, conventions and fansites can be tawdry. Many new publications are boring and often exploitative.

However, having read David’s A History of British Serial Killing, I knew this new take on the case would be more sober and have something new to say. David said one new aspect of the BBC1documentary was that they had been allowed to run the case files through the Home Office Large Major Enquiry System (HOLMES).

Five or six victims?

It is generally accepted that during the 1888 reign of horrible murders, someone killed five women in Whitechapel. Hallie Rubenhold’s excellent new book The Five is now challenging the orthodoxy that all the victims were prostitutes.

Along with the Silent Witness actor Emilia Fox, David has been able to use HOLMES as the police would do today, to find patterns in a complex series of crimes. In the film they argue there is strong evidence that there were actually six victims. Martha Tabram is cited here as the first one.

They then consult a geographic profiler with this news. Geo-profiling is another modern technique used to analyse a series of crimes to create a pattern. This pattern can then reveal where a perpetrator lives or works.

New pattern of crimes

This is a subject I became interested in when writing The Hunt for the 60s’ Ripper and some of my research ended up in February’s documentary Dark Son.

For this new film, they use the fresh geographic pattern of six victims including Tabram to reveal a possible suspect.

Does this mean it’s case closed for David and Emilia? I doubt it. But when there is so much nonsense and prurience circulating about this sad and tragic series of deaths, it should be intriguing to see a more measured and forensic approach being taken to this elusive case.

Jack the Ripper – The Case Reopened BBC1, Thursday 4 April, 9pm

Final day shooting on Dark Son

Ebenezer Baptist Church Centre

Originally posted on robinjarossi.com 2 9 18

Last Tuesday saw the conclusion of evidence being presented and filmed for Dark Son, the forthcoming BBC documentary about 1960s serial killer Jack the Stripper.

It a was a big day’s filming: for me 12 hours long, but for the Monster Films’ team much longer.

I was interviewed in the morning and was later on hand for a long session of afternoon-evening filming. Fascinating research from contributors, former police officers and others was explored.

It was a brilliant day. It was also a treat to be again working alongside criminologist Prof David Wilson and ex-detective Jackie Malton. David Howard (director) and Rik Hall (producer) from Monster ran the production calmly and superbly.

The venue was the Ebenezer Baptist Church Centre in Abertillery, Wales. The significance of the setting will become clear when the film is aired.

It has been in production throughout this year. I was initially involved for a chilly day’s filming in February on the Thames (two victims were found on the river foreshore).

From magazine feature to book to TV

I could not imagine how all this would unfold when I signed a contract to write The Hunt for the 60s’ Ripper in October 2016 (Mirror Books). The idea grew out of a feature I proposed for a true-crime magazine that Mirror Syndication were developing.

My argument was that the case – and victims – were largely forgotten today and it should be reviewed and remembered.

The magazine was eventually shelved, but I was able to develop the research I had for the article into a book. Following its publication, my research sparked further new findings about the unsolved 1960s murders of six women in west London.

The documentary team assembled high-quality experts to delve further into the case. I can’t talk about the film’s content, but anyone who thinks they know everything there is to know about the case should think again.

Dark Son is expected be broadcast in autumn 2018.